..................................................................................."Party" at a private home, BAR Project, Barcelona 2014.............................................images of by Eva Carasol.............
...................................................."They Want Us All To Crawl On Our Fucking Knees" (performance), Kunstverein, Amsterdam 2014..................................................................
....................................................................."Blending Blending Never Ending" (solo exhibition), Fons Welters, Amsterdam 2014.....................................................................
..........................."Subjects of Recognition: Parts 1+2" Huize Frankendael, If I Can't Dance I Don't Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution Offices, Amsterdam, 2014............................
......................................................................."Develop Your Legitimate Strangeness" (exhibition), Le Quartier, Quimper, 2014.................in collaboration with Max Allen............

........................................"To Make Art, To Take Clothes Off" (reading over skype) in collaboration with Huw Lemmey, Almanac Projects, London, 2014.......................................
...........................................................Costumes for "Museum" by Adriano Wilferts Jensen and Simon Asencio, multiple locations, 2014............................................................
...............................................Emanticipation (performance, set design) with Compagnie MUA, Fondacion Galeries Lafayette, Paris, 2014..............images: Sylvie Chan-Liat........
....................................................."Windstärke Fünf (The Summit of Sex)" (short film/screening installation) Open School East, London, 2013....................................................
..............................................."This isn't a portrait, it's a landscape" (performance) J.E Gregg Auditorium, Marfa High School, Texas, USA, 2013.................................................
.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
......................................................Blue Paint Makes Your Kidneys Bleed at "Lost & Found" at Muziekgebouw aan 't IJ, Amsterdam 2015............................................................
At the end of the night, after the automatic drawing machine, after the body, after the body as a machine, after Yves Klein, after crawling on our fucking knees, after fucking re-tweeting pictures of my performance, after my avatar, after my digital fucking image, after after after and then again.

Even if histories, people, data etc. are rationalised, cleaned up, erased and exterminated… a body covered in paint leaves some kind of mark... Oh, and blue paint makes your kidneys bleed.

Featuring: Josefin Arnell, Richard John Jones and Nikola Knežević

Originally filmed as part of "Lost & Found", 3rd April 2014 - an evening of presentations, performances and discussion co-edited by Richard John Jones, Alma Mathijsen and Julia Van Mourik.
“To know of some is good; but for the rest, silence is to be praised”
Ser Brunetto speaking of his fellow sodomites to Dante in the Inferno.

Camouflage as a material and metaphor can allow us to question the limits of our perception and the technologies that mediate the act of bearing witness. As a material, the abstract shapes and muted colours of camouflage are, in themselves, meaningless signifiers – they are designed only to do something (not to be something). What they do, if they do it successfully, is disappear.

Conversely, to be seen, to make oneself visible is not done by simply turning on the light, opening the curtains or through a moment of self-exposition. To be recognised is an identical procedure to camouflage, except that one uses the signification of the moment to inscribe oneself within a particular context. Either procedure leaves so much to be said for a life lived otherwise, of the things that simply cannot be said. What of the inarticulate, the outcast? What of the myriad of taboos that remain?

In response to these propositions, an event entitled Party was organised. It was a private dinner that took place in a private home in Barcelona (curtains closed) with a limited number of specially invited guests (and a few strangers). In the shadows, the pressures of being articulate or simply being recognised for what one is acting out do not apply. The dinner was a celebration of the insincere, of the covert, of the smooth operators and the unknowables.

It was also a tribute to the Spanish popular culture magazine entitled Party. Published from the mid-70s through the mid-80s, Party was written specifically for a male homosexual audience although, due to censorship laws under Franco, it masqueraded as a trashy heterosexual magazine often featuring naked women on the cover. It serves now as a potent reminder of how covert mass-communication can take place when certain things simply cannot be said.
A performance work in two parts.

The performance literally divides the body and the voice to consider the potentiality of each to produce a personal testament.

Part I departs from the tablaeu-vivant and pictorial traditions of 17th Century Dutch painting whilst also considering the widely distributed images of an uncontacted tribe in the Amazon rainforest. Taking place in the formal garden of the Huize Frankendael and viewed from the house's second floor; the performance reflects upon the audience’s act of bearing witness, and the authenticity of the performing subjects. Creating a distance between the observer and the observed, it explores the complexities that emerge when the image becomes a representation of a life lived otherwise.

Part II takes the form of three separate monologues that become repeated, shared and spoken simultaneously. Through its exploration of authorship and the constraints of the narrative form, the performance plays with the limits of personal testimony whilst reflecting upon Gertrude Stein’s extensive exploration within the genre of literary portraiture.

Subjects of Recognition focuses on the moment of bearing witness as a charged sphere in which personal narrative, acts of recognition, the body, the voice and tensions between authenticity and ambiguity contend with a larger context. The work derives from three research areas that include; 1) contemporary and historical examples of the presentation of sexual difference in legal scripts from the UK and US; 2) the act of withdrawal as a political gesture aligned with the sustainable living movement of the 1970s and ‘life’ as it could be lived otherwise; and 3) the broader notion of the framing of difference and the constant oscillation between the triad of camouflage, espionage and recognition as a way of positioning the lives of minority subjects under late-liberalism.

Featuring Josefin Arnell, Simon Asencio, Max Goran, Adriano Wilferts Jensen, Michele Rizzo, Taocheng Wang. It was presented at Huize Franendael and at If I Can't Dance respectively.
......................................."Flesh of Our Flesh (curtains)" in collaboration with AA Bronson, AA Bronson's House of Shame, Gwangju Biennial, Korea 2014.......................................
RADICAL FAERIES: CAMOUFLAGE, ESPIONAGE AND RECOGNITION

While spending a reasonable portion of my summer at Folleterre, a Radical Faerie sanctuary in the Vosges mountains in France, I became interested 
in a small article that I found in RFD, the reader-written journal that documents the lives of Radical Faeries and queer countryside living. In Washington on the National March in 1987, a landmark demonstration for gay rights and funding for AIDS, Radical Faeries attended wearing camouflage skirts produced by Oskrr Earthsong-Feino working with others under the name of Radical Faeries Fabrications. I am drawn to this example of a literal application of camouflage as a print and material, and to re-telling this history - to take care of its dissemination.

The Radical Faeries is now a network of queers, groups, communities and sanctuaries in the USA, Europe and Australia all operating independently yet in conversation, sharing resources, ideas, histories and modes of belonging. Rooted in the 1970s counter-culture of San Francisco, the Radical Faeries were founded by Harry Hay, a radical queer and former member of the Communist Party.

His proposal was to withdraw from urban life and form self-sustaining communities in the rural space. A history was found in the figure of the shaman, in paganism, in the appropriation of a Native American conception of the two-spirit and more generally the indigenous people’s relationship to the land.

What fascinated me about the skirts is that they are an example of how camouflage print is worn and distributed amongst a particular minoritised community that has chosen to live otherwise, away or withdrawn from contemporary spaces of recognition. Through the application of this print on the body of the minoritised subject, we see how in its trajectory from sanctuary to demonstration, camouflage moves from being used as a personal spiritual costume in a withdrawn space, to becoming a marker of recognition on a protest. The very idea of camouflage is to offer protection through invisibility. When it exceeds or contradicts this purpose, we learn more of the context and the hunter than we do of the prey. Through the ambiguity of the camouflage print as a signifier, we catch a glimpse of the personal 
and political agency of a queer movement’s insistence on withdrawal.

The very act of telling this story annunciates something of a life that is otherwise unremarkable, a bridge between here and a place that is always necessarily elsewhere. The signifier of the camouflage pattern and its use within the workshop of Radical Faeries Fabrications is a fragile or temporary gesture, a momentary signifier of collectivity. Indeed, the clothing as a particular object or mode of identification is immediately undone, unstitched and repurposed in its encounter with others. It is only yet another object that represents the restless experimentation with the givenness of life and how it can be otherwise than it is.

Richard John Jones, Amsterdam, February 2014.
Using only images of Liberace’s hands and a court transcript from one of his well-publicised libel trials in the late 1950s, Windstärke Fünf (The Summit of Sex) explores the discrepancy between Liberace’s highly flamboyant co-authored public image and the legal preoccupation with his body.

"I have to report that Mr. Liberace, like "WIND-STARKE FUNF" is about the most that man can take. But he is not a drink. He is YEARNING WINDSTRENGTH FIVE. He is the summit of sex - the pinnacle of Masculine, Feminine and Neuter." The Daily Mirror 1959

The film is accompanied by a text written collaboratively by Denise Ferreira da Silva, Calogero Giametta and Richard John Jones. The text brings together the visual research conducted by Jones for his film and the specific academic enquiries of Giametta and Da Silva. Rather than comparing, the three discuss in parallel the semiotic universe constructed by Liberace over a period of significant social change in the USA alongside notions of spaciality, narrative and biographical borders experienced by queer asylum seekers, and legal cases in which race is foregrounded as a key signifier of difference.

This text poster and a screening installation featuring 4 semi-transparent prints were produced for Open School East, London. The film was subsequently screened at Fringe Film Festival, London.

The text poster entitled "A Handkerchief and the Old Heave-Ho" is available to download HERE
"AA Bronson is joined by Philip Aarons, Ryan Brewer Elijah Burgher, TM Davy, K8 Hardy, Richard John Jones, Yeonjune Jung, Bradford Kessler, Travis Meinolf, and Reima Hirvonen. All artists, in collaboration with Bronson, have contributed to creating an expositional outcome of multiple forms and practices. From the mystical and the occult, to the sexual and the erotic, to the collecting and representing of alternative subjectivities, struggles and survival tactics, House of Shame is full of symbols, full of potentials, full of irony and humor, which underline moments of history, trauma and hope. Rather than a singular unity, the project presents a fascinating diversity in mediums and outputs. Rather than a dominant figure AA Bronson becomes both the instigator and the commonality that brings all the practices together."

http://hyperallergic.com/161701/an-ecology-of-affect-and-desire-aa-bronsons-house-of-shame/
Upon arriving at the gallery, flags with colourfully abstracted texts and patterns mark the entrance. As we enter, we appear to be “back stage” or at least, in the shadows. Partially transparent curtains filter the light, casting deep projections on the walls. Bodies and space become obscured yet at the same time our movements take centre stage. Moving further, entering the light, we are confronted with other bodies, embellished in folkloric costumes. The garments correspond to narratives and stories stemming from research related to the Radical Faeries, a counter-cultural queer commune movement that emerged in California in the late 1970s. Through employing intensive craft processes and juxtaposing ideas of performativity with politics of refusal and withdrawal, Jones considers what it means to take care of minor histories and how these might be disseminated without requiring full disclosure.
The Antisocial Curtains were commissioned and produced by Fondacion Galeries Lafayette, Paris, as part of Emanticipation, a collaboration with Compangnie MUA and Emmanuelle Huynh.

“EMANTICIPATION, UN LABORATOIRE”
Par Alexis Jakubowicz / Responsable des éditions et des nouveaux médias

Après Fujiwara le rideau est tombé. Au rez-de-chaussée du 9 rue du Plâtre est revenue la froide virginité du bâtiment faussement abandonné, en proie depuis des mois à toutes les métamorphoses. Quelques planches de bois y ont été montées pour accueillir la première réunion de travail d’Emanticipation, un laboratoire.

Anna Gaïotti, Anne-Lise Le Gac, Volmir Cordeiro et Richard John Jones s’y sont retrouvés un dimanche soir de mars, en compagnie du performeur Pascal Quéneau. Manquaient encore Katerina S. Andreou et bien évidemment Emmanuelle Huynh. C’est sous sa direction, de 2004 à 2012, que certains ont suivi la formation Essai, programme pour auteur chorégraphique du CNDC d’Angers, où l’on s’est appliqué à une vision élargie de la danse. La Fondation a souhaité non seulement prolonger la réflexion d’Emmanuelle Huynh mais encore offrir à certains de ses anciens élèves, ainsi qu’à leurs invités, un cadre de travail et de production. Ensemble, ils ont interrogé la nature collective du travail performatif, son processus et ses conventions. On a vu ces artistes, qui ont fait profession du mouvement, s’arrêter dans le dialogue. Tous leurs itinéraires ont soudainement convergé. La Fondation devait devenir leur point de ralliement.

Les émanticipés s’y sont couchés au flanc. On les a vus tenter de converser en cœur, bouches à oreilles en même temps ouvertes, s’inter-coupant les uns les autres, dans un défi lancé par Richard John Jones d’après un exercice imaginé par Gertrude Stein. Peut-on parler et s’écouter simultanément ? L’impolitesse, écrite en plein dans la question de l’asociabilité, fut ainsi posée. Le groupe a voulu s’inventer un désir, sauver sa peau collectivement, faire que chaque membre se dégage de son corps propre jusqu’à se fondre dans un corps social. Il aura fallu guetter sans cesse dans les questions, les reprises et les répétitions, l’épuisement de l’oralité pour voir venir le basculement du texte à l’action comme aurait dit Ricœur. Durant trois jours, la compagnie a reçu des invités ou émanticipateurs pour l’aider dans sa tâche : Anna Colin, curatrice associée de la Fondation ; Anne-James Chaton, écrivain-performeur ; Judith Wambacq, philosophe ; Benjamin Loiseau, architecte ; Maurizio Lazzarato, philosophe également ; le critique d’art Guy Tortosa et la chercheuse Pauline Le Boulba. Tous ont pratiqué sur les artistes du laboratoire une somaïeutique, l’art d’accoucher l’esprit pour qu’il accouche du corps.
http://lafayetteanticipation.squarespace.com/compagniemua/
KEEPING WATCH ABOVE THE FLOWERS 2012-ongoing
PRODUCTIONS WHILST CO-DIRECTOR OF AUTO ITALIA SOUTH EAST 2011-2012
⤴︎ Auto Italia LIVE: Double Dip Concession
⤴︎ Auto Italia LIVE: C2C P2P
⤴︎ Auto Italia LIVE: Cosmosis
⤴︎ Auto Italia LIVE: Talking Objects in Space
⤴︎ Bodies Assembling - a collaboration with Cinenova
⤴︎ We Have Our Own Concept of Time and Motion
TRANSLATING AUTONOMIA 2010-2013
↓ [PDF] This Isn’t a Portrait, It’s a Landscape
OTHER WORKS AND EXHBITIONS 2008-2015
↓ [PDF] Proh-soh'pa-peer
↓ [PDF] We Have Our Own Concept of Time and Motion
COLLABORATIONS
TEXTS
An overview of work by Richard John Jones
↓ [PDF] I'll Never Tell
⤴︎ [book contribution] Radical Faeries; Camouflage, Espionage and Recognition
⤴︎ [text] To Make Art, To Take Clothes Off
⤴︎ [book contribution] Sisters
↓ [PDF] Interview With Daniel Jacoby
⤴︎ [text] Barbara Hammer, Stuart Comer and Auto Italia
⤴︎ [text] This Is The Pilot, This Is The Final Episode
↓ [PDF] Terre Thaemlitz and Michael Oswell
⤴︎ [text] Points of Identification
⤴︎ [text] Translating Autonomia
CONVERSATIONS
INFORMATION
Introduction to KEEPING WATCH ABOVE THE FLOWERS 2012-ongoing............................................................................................................................................................
The body of work Keeping Watch Above The Flowers is an ongoing project that draws on physical and material abstractions of research into the ‘wilderness’ in romantic pictorial traditions, the hand crafted production of camouflage, largely by women, in the beginning of the 20th Century and its relationship with the 'invention of abstraction' in art. Drawing on stories and mythologies of individuals or communities who are subject to complex regimes of recognition and visibility, the project is becoming a collection of diverse sources and references spanning the military industrial complex, modern art of the early 20th century and counter-cultural political expression to queer withdrawal, witchcraft and minimalist painting.

The work, mostly comprised of performances and textile-based sculptures engages with an understanding of contexts in which appearance, recognition and visibility become complicated, the works contend with the limitations of personal testament and the inherent abstraction involved in the production of an affective narrative.

In a context where we are presumed or expected to have a hyper-reflexive relationship with the digital image and virtuality what does it mean to the act of bearing witness? As most people operate within or are subject to larger representational regimes or political discourses (when the option for disappearance or 'reclaiming' one's misrepresentation) what then is the price of this partial recognition?
↓ [PDF] Calogero Giametta and Denise Ferreira da Silva

...................................................................................Keeping Watch Above the Flowers, Wysing Arts Centre, 2014.....................................................................................
"Suddenly there was all kinds of people, all kinds of people all over the place"

Bodies, clothing, poses, looks and acts of looking are performed using the moments of entrance and exit that are intrinsic to fashion presentations. Using a minimal choreography - a study of physical presence - the performance draws attention to the framing of the body in live performance and the construction of the audience as voyeur.

Performed in a public square with a myriad of cameramen documenting, and partly directing, the performers there is a discomfort between who the audience really is for this spectacle. The performance is produced as both an act of liveness whilst simultaneously presenting the mechanism of its preservation.

Originally performed on Gerard Douplein, Amsterdam, commissioned and produces by Kunstverein for 'Eau de Cologne.'
....................................Viewer Report of Subjects of Recognition: Parts I & II. Maria Guggenbichler on Richard John Jones, http://www.ificantdance.org/........................................

Go directly to: http://www.ificantdance.org/Agenda/SubjectsOfRecognition
VIEWER REPORTS
....................................Viewer Report of Lost and Found at Muziekgebouw, Amsterdam, co-edited by Richard John Jones, Alma Mathijsen and Julia Van Mourik...............................
Go directly to: http://www.lost.nl/en/events/2015-04-03-lost-found-muziekgebouw
RJJ

b. Chesterfield, UK 1986

based: UK/FR

o p p o s i t e j o n e s @ g m a i l . c o m
Go to the video: https://vimeo.com/96402881
“It is a simple question of how one can describe. Simple. It is simply that question.

How can one portray without recognition, insist without repetition and describe without reference?

The auditorium is filled with cut-ups of images. I find myself next to an image of a gay rubber fetish model with PIG emblazoned on his back that has been cut out of some trashy gay magazine to be included in one of Babi Badalov’s visual poems. There are small lights that run around us forming a rectangle that sits diagonally in the space. I think the rubber pig goes with my leather trousers, so I make this my location. We are told to lie down like sardines. I look upwards. My shoes are in the hallway outside. There are also photogram images on the floor. They look celestial, like planets or solar eclipses. A strong white circle overlaid with a fuzzy crescent corona. I find out later that these are photograms of butt plugs – a butt plug as a sundial?” - To Make Art, To Take Clothes Off, Richard John Jones 2014.

A live performative skype reading of "To Make Art To Take Clothes Off" with Huw Lemmey, performed as part of Nina Wakeford exhibition at Almanac Projects, London.
⤴︎ [text] Fritz Haeg
⤴︎ [audio] Marina Vishmidt and Mark Fisher
⤴︎ [audio] Charlie Woolley and Group Material
This performance work, which features a 9 voice choir, was performed live at Marfa High School and broadcast on Marfa Public Radio, Texas, USA. It tells the story of climbing to the top of a mountain exploring the ‘peak’ as narrative climax, the flatness of the image and Jean Genet’s notion of the desert as the resting place of images.

Deconstructing the art of telling a story and considering what it at stake in act of bearing witness - the performance goes in and out of a variety of different images and references including Rock Hudson in order to consider the closet in terms of a refusal of appearance or performance. The story is punctuated by an untrained choir of people from the local community performing 10 poems that punctuate and echo throughout the fragmented narrative.

Chorus: Melissa Miller, Larraitz Torres, Lex Kosieradski, Hanan Benammar, Diedrich Brackens, Shaun O’Dell, Irina Contreras, Silvia Ulloa Marques and Sarah Jones.

Images courtesy of Theo Thegalaers and Paulien Oltheten

The title is borrowed from a line of the poem The Valley of Unrest by Edgar Allen Poe:

Once it smiled a silent dell
Where the people did not dwell;
They had gone unto the wars,
Trusting to the mild-eyed stars,
Nightly, from their azure towers,
To keep watch above the flowers...
CURATORIAL PROJECT
⤴︎ Documenting Sex
...................................................................Looking For Headless (documentary film) made in collaboration with Kate Cooper 2010..................................................................
Looking for Headless (2010) is a documentary film by Kate Cooper and Richard John Jones, commissioned by Goldin+Senneby in the frame of Headless, a project initiated in 2007.

Looking for Headless begins as an investigation into a company called 'Headless Limited'. Receiving a tape of footage from a private detective and some clues from Goldin+Senneby, the filmmakers are quickly drawn into a private world of tax havens, conspiracy and fraudulent identities. Quickly lost in the rituals and regulations associated with this complex aspect of global finance, the pair gather advice from academics, investigative journalists and lobbyists alike.

Attempting to bring truth and reality to a largely abstract world, they narrate their search for something that exists only on paper and begin to realise that, in Looking for Headless, they must attempt to address a more fundamental question; how does one represent the un-representable? Whilst also negotiating their relationship with Goldin+Senneby, the filmmakers quickly arrive at an impasse: if Headless Limited doesn't physically exist and documentary becomes purely narrative fiction, what could this mean about representing the 'truth' – how does one look for Headless?

More information on the project (including the documentary) - T.J. Demos on Goldin+Senneby, ArtForum: http://www.goldinsenneby.com/articles/Demos-Goldin+Senneby.pdf
Selected Screenings

- Síndrome - La Capella, Barcelona, ES.
- Maintenance Required - The Kitchen, New York, US.
- Abstract Possible - Eastside Projects, Birmingham, UK.
- Power to the people - ACCA, Melbourne, AU.
- Headless at Regus - Western Front ,Vancouver, CA.
- Hydrarchy - Gasworks, London, UK.
- The Decapitation of Money - Kadist Art Foundation, Paris, FR.
- Headless - CCS Bard, New York, US.
- Blow Up My Town - The Knot, Berlin.
- The Man Behind the Curtain - Mission 17, San Francisco, US.
- Headless - The Power Plant, Toronto, CA.

..............................................................................................................Proh-soh'pa-peer 2009................................................................................................................
Selected Screenings

- Me, You And Everyone We Meet - BAR Project, Zum Zeig Cinema, Barcelona, ES.
- Queer Art and Political Engagement: Jarman’s Legacy - British Film Insititute, London, UK.
- Sex/Commune - Limazulu, London, UK.
- Proh-soh’pa-peer - [SPACE}, London, UK

With each person and situation – there is an event. An event, however, in the moment of its happening, demonstrates an unwillingness to be circumscribed – remaining an accumulation of ultimately unattainable actions, thoughts and feelings.

What comes to be of an event, then, is only its interpretation and mediation. Why events and, more specifically, subject positions emerging from them are interpreted and, ultimately, mediated in certain ways by contemporary culture thus becomes a significant question.

Proh-Soh’ Pa-Peer was a two-part live event/exhibition by Richard John Jones that zoned in on the phenomenon of the mainstream media representation of minority political groups or alternative communities in order to explore this question.

The first exhibition, co-produced by Auto Italia South East over one day on Saturday August 8th, adopted the look and attitude of a Live TV show. Proceedings were shot in front of an open-invite audience and encompassed performances and actions that variably centered on the dialectical relationship between sex and power in both historical and contemporary modes of political activism. Highly choreographed, yet suitably chaotic, the performance incorporated multi-scenarios, players and situations including a live performance by t-girl terrorist music group Prolapse.

Ideas of protest, libidinal identity and sexual expression were given the time and space to be played out – elevated to the status of broadcast content and championed throughout a strange and temporary hermetic world conjured up by Jones inside Auto Italia South East’s cavernous warehouse space.

The subsequent film installation that took place at SPACE only three weeks later included an edit of the highly mediated events that preceded - reflecting the contemporary news cycle and instantaneous forms of reprentation.

A publication was also edited to accompany the project which you can download here: http://counter-re-production.hotglue.me/start-copy.head.143059742796
..................................................................................................................Do It For Real 2010.................................................................................................................
During the height of the student protests in London during 2010 a police van was heavily damaged during a demonstration. The image circulated in the national press and online and became indicative of the public opinion on the demonstrations.

However, it raised some difficult questions as it was highly unlikely that the police would choose to loose a van and that they could be so unprepared. It was widely believed that it was planned in order to help justify the disproportional level of violence the police were using against protesters; that it was, in essence, a PR stunt by the police - using the theatre of protest to produce an image that would represent the protesters in a particular light. The protest was literally, at this moment, a war of images.

At the following demonstration, the image was installed in the Window Galleries of Central St Martins School of Art and Design nearby the proposed protest route. Unexpectedly, a group of protesters graffitied the window with the phrase "Do It For Real." A photograph of this began circulating online which was instantaneously duplicated and hung in from of the previous image.
Introduction to TRANSLATING AUTONOMIA 2010-2013................................................................................................................................................................................
This project is comprised of multiple screenings of a translated and subtitled film introduced in person by Federico Campagna and Richard John Jones, and a body of texts documenting and investigating these events.

Il Trasloco (Moving out of the future) is a 1991 independent documentary directed by Renato de Maria and was screened for the first time in the UK with English subtitles at Auto Italia South East, London in 2010. The film is set in Bologna and retrospectively depicts the history of one of the key places where Autonomia took place during the 1970s, focussing on Franco Berardi "Bifo" as he prepares the move out of his communal house.

The texts can be found at the following links:
- Il Trasloco - Moving out the Future by Federico Campagna 2011
- Translating Autonomia by Richard John Jones 2011
- Il Trasloco - Points of Identification by Richard John Jones, 2013
..............................................................................................Il Trasloco (Moving Out Of the Future) 2010................................................................................................
"In 1972, Franco Berardi, aka ‘Bifo’, moved with couple of friends into a flat at the number 19 of Via Marsili, in Bologna’s medieval city centre. In January 1991, a young man from Iran, one from Zaire and the 41 year-old Bifo were evicted from that same flat by the landlord. In between those two dates, not only 19 years had passed through those walls, but also an incalculable amount of people, stories, political movements, zines, free radios, police raids, and all sorts of poetic and existential experiments.

Leaving such an extraordinary place was surely not going to be an easy thing to do. A friend of Bifo, a psychoanalyst, Felix Guattari, made a precise diagnosis of what would have been the impact of this ‘moving out’ (in Italian, ‘trasloco’) on those involved. ‘I am afraid, you will be depressed for at least six months’, he said. It was almost shyly that Bifo dared to question his friend’s prediction. In bumping into another friend of his, the film maker Renato de Maria, at the Termini train station in Rome, Bifo desperately sighed ‘But I don’t want to be depressed!’. Renato, who had lived in the flat in Via Marsili for some months as well, didn’t lose his calm. ‘No need to be depressed,’ he said, ‘let’s take this into our hands and turn it upside down. Let’s make a documentary!’ Bifo took one second to think about it, then did what he had always done any time he had encountered an idea that resonated with him. ‘Absolutely! Let’s do it,’ he replied. Less than twelve months later, on Christmas night 1991, the third channel of Italian State Television, Rai Tre, broadcasted a 75 minutes documentary titled ‘Il Trasloco’ (literally ‘Moving Out’)". - Federico Campagna 2011.
Production by Henry Hartley and Adam Haggerty
Selected Screenings

- Kunstverein, Amsterdam, NL
- Parasol Unit, London, UK
- Transmission Gallery, Glasgow UK
- L aRadi o Siamo Noi - HEAD, Geneva, Switzerland, SZ
- The Film Exercise - Arnolfini, Bristol UK
- Artists Film Club - ICA, London, UK
- Auto Italia South East, London, UK

...................Prints and textiles for "OKAY CONFIANCE #2" at Rond Point Project Room, Marseille, 2015............in collaboration with Elise Carron and Anne Lise Le Gac.....................
Richard John Jones in collaboration with Elise Carron and Anne Lise Le Gac produced a series of 22 unique hand-printed t-shirts and a flag for the event "OKAY CONFIANCE #2"




"OKAY CONFIANCE #2
IS A FESTIVAL
WANT TO SAY MORE LIKE AN EVENT
A SITUATION
A T-SHIRT
A PERFORMANCE
BBQ
DURING WHICH ACTIONS ARE EXPOSED/SHARED..."